HEALTHY  YORKIE  PUPPIES  FOR  SALE


We are a family owned puppy store and boutique, with over 15 years of experience.

Overview


Small in size but big in personality, the Yorkshire Terrier makes a feisty but loving companion. The most popular toy dog breed in the U.S/Canada., the “Yorkie” has won many fans with his devotion to their owners, their elegant looks, and their suitability to apartment living.

About Yorkie Breed

Weight: 3.5-7 lbs
Height: 9-10 inches
Color(s): Brown/Gold/Chocolate/Black

Children & Other Pets

Because of their small size, Yorkies aren't suited to families with young children. Most breeders won't sell puppies to people whose children are younger than 5 or 6 years old. It's just too easy for children to drop them, step on them, or hold them too tightly. Yorkies can get along well with other pets, including cats, if socialized to them at an early age. They're bold in going after strange dogs, however, even those that outweigh them by a factor of ten, and protecting them from themselves becomes second nature to people with Yorkies.

Feeding

Recommended daily amount: 1/2 to 3/4 cup of high-quality dry food a day, divided into two meals. Note: How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don't all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you'll need to shake into your dog's bowl. Take care that your Yorkie doesn't get fat. Roly-poly is not a good look for this elegant breed. Keep your Yorkie in good shape by measuring his food and feeding him twice a day rather than leaving food out all the time. If you're unsure whether he's overweight, give him the eye test and the hands-on test. First, look down at him. You should be able to see a waist. Then place your hands on his back, thumbs along the spine, with the fingers spread downward. You should be able to feel but not see his ribs without having to press hard. If you can't, he needs less food and more exercise. For more on feeding your Yorkshire Terrier, see our guidelines for buying the right food, feeding your puppy, and feeding your adult dog.

More traits and characteristics of Yorkshire Terriers

If I was considering a Yorkshire Terrier, I would be most concerned about...
  • 1) Grooming. Without frequent brushing and combing, Yorkshire Terriers become a matted mess. If you can't commit to the brushing, you have to commit to frequent trimming to keep the coat short, neat, and healthy. You can even shear the coat very short with clippers and then you won't need to brush it at all. Personally I love this sheared cut because it's so easy to care for and makes a Yorkshire Terrier look like a cute puppy throughout his life!
  • 2) Fragility. Too many people acquire a toy breed without understanding how incredibly fragile a toy breed is. You can seriously injure a Yorkshire Terrier by stepping on him or by sitting on him when he's curled under a blanket or pillow, where he frequently likes to sleep. And Yorkies can seriously injure or kill themselves by leaping from your arms or off the back of your sofa. A larger dog can grab a Yorkshire Terrier and break his neck with one quick shake. Owning a toy breed means constant supervision and surveillance of what's going on around your tiny dog. Yorkshire Terriers must always be kept on-leash -- they are just too easy to injure when not under your complete control.
  • 3) Providing enough socialization. Some Yorkies are friendly and outgoing, but many have the standoffish or suspicious nature of a true terrier. Thus, Yorkshire Terriers need extensive exposure to people and to unusual sights and sounds. Otherwise their suspicion can become shrillness, or even nastiness.
  • 4) Barking. With their keen senses, Yorkies make excellent watchdogs. However, this can make them too quick to sound the alarm at every new sight and sound. You have to be equally quick to stop them before this tendency becomes an established habit. If that training is to be successful, your Yorkshire Terrier needs to respect you so that he stops barking when you tell him to. Serious health problems. Many Yorkshire Terriers live a good long life, but unfortunately this breed is very prone to a severe liver disease called liver shunt. Other health concerns include knee problems that can require expensive surgery, plus eye diseases

If you want a dog who...

Is small, fine-boned, elegant, easy to carry, and doesn't take up much space
Sheds very lightly (one of the best breeds for allergy sufferers)
Is lively and inquisitive, and moves swiftly with light-footed grace
Doesn't need a lot of exercise
Makes a keen watchdog -- won't fail to announce strangers
Is peaceful with other pets
A Yorkshire Terrier may be right for you.

SHIPPING

Is it really safe for the puppy?
I receive many inquiries on the process of shipping a puppy--individuals often wonder if it is safe and how it works. Won't he/she be scared? How long does it take?
Won't it be difficult for the puppy having to be all alone in a crate for so long?
This is how I explain the shipping process to individuals to help them feel more at ease with the process of getting a puppy:
Shipping a Puppy Is Very safe: See Below Details
Shipping a puppy by itself to a new location always sounds cruel and embarrassing, but actually I think it is harder for us than the puppy(s). With my many years of shipping experience, I know for a fact that all of the pups are well taken care of. So if you stop and think about it, the airlines are not going to mistreat the puppy(s) for fear of lawsuit and customer dissatisfaction. I tape puppy(s) food and feeding instructions to the top of the crate and put frozen water in the crate, so it will gradually thaw out for the puppy(s) and the puppies are offered food along the ride.
The average flight is approximately 2 to 5 hours. I always ask about any delays or layovers and know the exact times and departures of the flights, so I know where the pup is and am able to give you the information as well.
The pup will arrive the same day as it is sent--usually a few hours. I have a big fluffy bed of shredded newspapers in the crate for the puppy(s) to nestle in and usually a pig's ear chew (they love them), and a toy or sock with my scent on it--to help the pup feel secure.
What about shipping in the winter –is it not too cold?
If you decide on a puppy, I will guarantee -as I have many years of experience that he/she will arrive safe and sound. Puppies can be shipped safely between 20 and 85 degrees--All puppies ride in the belly of the plane where the temperature is kept at a comfortable 70 degrees--same as for the passengers--and they are the last on and first off the plane. Shipping during this time of year is completely safe and there is no problem so we need not to be afraid about that. Just like a person getting on a flight to go meet their relatives and/or friends for the holidays, shipping a puppy is very similar-and probably even a little easier. The only thing different about this time of year is that the airlines can be strict on the minimum temperature at each location (which is really good for the puppy(s) even though the plane is always kept at 70 degrees. I believe it is mainly for their liability and protection. Likewise, in the summertime--they will not ship if temperatures are too hot along the way. If this is the case, we will just wait for the next best day to ship or ship earlier or later in the day to combat the hot/cold part of the day.
NOTE.. Most shippers specialized in shipping pets will use a temperature regulation crate called an electronic crate.
These type of crates are used anytime since they can regulate the temperature to the one best for the puppy(s) travel
What is involved in the shipping process?
Since I am 30 minutes from my nearest airport and do not charge extra for delivery like most breeders, I try to make each trip count as much as possible by taking multiple puppies at a time while striving to accommodate to your specified times. Therefore it helps me greatly if you can specify multiple times/days you (or any other person with ID) would be available to pick up the puppy. So if you are interested in having one of the pup after all amounts have been received, I am able to book the pup. I will need to know the day(s) and time(s) you are able to pick up the puppy(s) your nearest airport, and your home address and phone number.
Usually, I can only book a flight a day in advance so they are aware of the temperatures for shipping. After I have booked the pup, I will call and/or email you with the flight number times, and location where the puppy(s) is to be picked up. All you need to do is pick up the pup at your airport--taking a couple forms of identification, like a driver's license or insurance card and the airway bill number that I give you. Then I ask individuals to contact me as soon as possible after they receive their puppy as I'm very anxious to hear about the puppy--if everything went well --what you think--and any other questions you might have.